Films

Here's a list of films that are screening with Flicks in the Sticks. 

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Salmon Fishing In The Yemen (12a)

A visionary sheik believes his passion for the peaceful pastime of salmon fishing can enrich the lives of his people, and he dreams of bringing the sport to the not so fish-friendly desert. Willing to spare no expense, he instructs his representative to turn the dream into reality, an extraordinary feat that will require the involvement of Britain's leading fisheries expert who happens to think the project both absurd and unachievable.

Saving Mr Banks (PG)

A likable drama centred on the development of the 1964 Walt Disney Studios film Mary Poppins, starring Emma Thompson as author P. L. Travers and Tom Hanks as filmmaker Walt Disney. Named after the father in Travers' story, the film depicts the author's fortnight-long visit to 1961 Los Angeles as she is pursued by Disney, in his attempts to obtain the screen rights to her novels. Together they set Mary Poppins free to make one of the most endearing films in cinematic history.

Shoplifters (15)

This is a complex, moving drama about the forces holding a struggling family together. In Tokyo, poverty-stricken family the Shibatas routinely turn to petty thieving to make ends meet. A rare depiction of Japanese society’s urban underclass, exquisitely drawn and full of Kore-eda’s trademark subtlety and nuanced moral inquiry. Winner Palme D’Or Cannes Film Festival 2018

Sing Street (12a)

SING STREET takes us back to 1980s Dublin seen through the eyes of a 14-year-old boy named Conor (Ferdia Walsh-Peelo) who is looking for a break from a home while trying to adjust to his new inner-city school. He finds a glimmer of hope in the beautiful Raphina (Lucy Boynton), and with the aim of winning her heart he invites her to star in his band's music videos. There's only one problem: he's not part of a band...yet. Inspired by writer/director John Carney's (ONCE, BEGIN AGAIN) life and love for music, SING STREET shows us a world where music has the power to take us away from everyday life and transform us.

Sorry We Missed You (15)

Ken Loach returns to the milieu of 2016’s I, Daniel Blake with the fierce, vital Sorry We Missed You, supported by his longtime collaborators, screenwriter Paul Laverty and producer Rebecca O’Brien. Following its premiere at Cannes (where it received rave reviews), it’s a passionate indictment of Tory austerity and the absurdities and cruelties of the gig economy. Ricky (Kris Hitchen) lost his building work and mortgage after the 2008 financial crash. Now renting with his wife Abbie (Debbie Honeywood), a contract nurse and carer and their kids, he is unable to pass up a job driving for a delivery company. But it turns out the role is horribly exploitative, and with his wife facing similar pressures in her own job, their family life becomes more and more toxic. Rigorously researched via off-the-record interviews, Sorry We Missed You depicts the ruinous human cost of zerohours contracts with gut-wrenching honesty and integrity. A heartbreaking and incendiary film, it’s a searing critique of zero hours Britain.

Stan And Ollie (12a)

Steve Coogan and John C Reilly, two brilliant physical comedians, give delightful performances nailing the duo’s body language, mannerisms and routines. 1953 with their immense fame on the wane, Stan ‘Laurel’ and Ollie ‘Hardy’ embark on a gruelling farewell tour of British seaside towns. The tour starts badly; modest music halls, cramped little guesthouses, they struggle for audiences. But a series of TV guest spots rekindle the country’s interest and the buzz grows as they head towards a big London finale. But old resentments surface, particularly once ‘the wives’, Lucille and Ida, (a hilarious double act in their own right) join them. A charming, poignant, insightful study of lifelong male friendship this is a fitting tribute to the greatest pair of comedians of all time.

Still Life (12a)

Beautifully crafted and exquisitely observed with an outstanding performance from Eddie Marsan as John, the lonely council worker who tracks down the family of those who have died alone. When John is made redundant he focuses all his efforts on his last case of his elderly neighbour, Billy, uncovering a life of mischief, misadventure, love and regret. Laced with humour and pathos, this is a potent, poignant exploration of love and death, solitude and the breakdown of community. This provides much bittersweet comfort and joy as it reaches a most unexpected close that will tug at your heartstrings.

Suffragette (12a)

A drama that tracks the story of the foot soldiers of the early feminist movement, women who were forced underground to pursue a dangerous game of cat and mouse with an increasingly brutal State. These women were not primarily from the genteel educated classes, they were working women who had seen peaceful protest achieve nothing. Radicalized and turning to violence as the only route to change, they were willing to lose everything in their fight for equality - their jobs, their homes, their children and their lives. Maud was one such foot soldier. The story of her fight for dignity is as gripping and visceral as any thriller, it is also heart-breaking and inspirational.

Swimming with Men (12a)

Feel-good larkiness in jaunty but formulaic style. Accountant Eric is simply treading water when he discovers a newfound sense of purpose thanks to an unexpected source: a group of similarly stuck-in-a-rut guys who have found camaraderie through synchronized swimming. Sure, they may be a bit paunchy, but they're determined to prove they have what it takes to be a whirling, twirling, scissor-kicking aquatic dream team

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