Films

Here's a list of films that will be screening with Flicks in the Sticks over the coming months. 

If you haven't been to one of our screenings before please give us a try, especially if you fancy a different type of experience from the multiplex cinemas (Cineworld for example). 

Below you can search for screenings in different ways by changing the method of 'SORT BY' to either FILM title, DATE or VENUE.

There are venue details available (click on the venue name) giving you an idea of where the venue is and how accessible it is.  We hope to see you soon.

Download a list of films for August /September
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La La Land (12a)

Mia, an aspiring actress, serves lattes to movie stars in between auditions and Sebastian, a jazz musician, scrapes by playing cocktail party gigs in dingy bars, but as success mounts they are faced with decisions that begin to fray the fragile fabric of their love affair, and the dreams they worked so hard to maintain in each other threaten to rip them apart.

Lady Macbeth (12a)

When a young woman is bought, married off and oppressed by an older man, her sanity slowly starts to unwind. Taking comfort in the arms of the stable boy sets off a chain of events as unstoppable as they are tragic. ***** The Guardian - 'Brilliantly chilling subversion of a classic.

Laura (U)

Detective Mark McPherson investigates the killing of Laura, found dead on her apartment floor before the movie starts. McPherson builds a mental picture of the dead girl from the suspects whom he interviews. He is helped by the striking painting of the late lamented Laura hanging on her apartment wall. But who would have wanted to kill a girl with whom every man she met seemed to fall in love? To make matters worse, McPherson finds himself falling under her spell too. Then one night, halfway through his investigations, something seriously bizarre happens to make him re-think the whole case.

Letters from Baghdad (PG)

Gertrude Bell was a pioneering English writer, archaeologist, diplomat and spy whose travels through the Arabian desert gave her local knowledge unparalleled by her British peers. Recruited by British Military Intelligence after World War I, she played a significant – often unrecognised – role in British imperial policy-making in the Middle East, notably Iraq. Openly critical of colonial practices, Bell’s insights are a singular, prescient prism through which to understand both the Middle East and the all-male inner sanctum of British colonial power. Reflecting on the life, work and character of this remarkable woman, Oelbaum and Krayenbühl weave together a rich tapestry of fascinating archive alongside Bell’s writings, letters to her parents voiced by Tilda Swinton, and testimony from peers including TE Lawrence and Vita Sackville-West. Though writing a century ago, the acute contemporary relevance of Bell’s words is astonishing – at times even chilling.

Lion (PG)

In 1986, Saroo was a five-year-old child in India of a poor but happy rural family. On a trip with his brother, Saroo soon finds himself alone and trapped in a moving decommissioned passenger train that takes him to Calcutta, 1500 miles away from home. Now totally lost in an alien urban environment and too young to identify either himself or his home to the authorities, Saroo struggles to survive as a street child until he is sent to an orphanage. Soon, Saroo is selected to be adopted by the Brierley family in Tasmania, where he grows up in a loving, prosperous home. However, for all his material good fortune, Saroo finds himself plagued by his memories of his lost family in his adulthood and tries to search for them even as his guilt drives him to hide this quest from his adoptive parents and his girlfriend.

Locke (15)

Leaving the construction site on the eve of a major project, construction manager Ivan Locke receives news that sends him driving the two hours from Birmingham to London, but even further from the life he once knew. Making the decision that he has to make, he then calls his wife, his sons, his co-workers and boss telling them the secret that he is bearing and trying to keep his job and family intact. But even more importantly, he will have to face himself and the choices he has made.

Long Forgotten Fields (12)

Long Forgotten Fields is a dark, young-adult love story set in the Shropshire countryside. Lily’s routine existence of work, family and friends is called into question when her soldier boyfriend Sam comes home on leave. Any expectations she has of rekindling their relationship are overturned as she is drawn deeper into his post-war world. When Sam needs a place to retreat, Lily is happy to offer up her childhood hangout, but in trying to make the old bird hide an idyll she unintentionally cuts herself off from all and everything that she knows. Ultimately, she is forced to embark on a journey that will either destroy or affirm their relationship; a journey which shows that only the strength and resilience of Lily’s love can combat the trauma which Sam has brought back from war.

Love Is Thicker Than Water (15)

Taking its cue from Romeo and Juliet, LOVE IS THICKER THAN WATER is a tale of lovers from different sides of the tracks. Vida comes from a well heeled London family, whereas Arthur is a bike messenger from a working-class Welsh mining town. Utterly in love, their relationship is nevertheless tested when their wildly different worlds collide. Sensitive, quirky, always uncompromisingly truthful and interspersed with surprising animation, LOVE IS THICKER THAN WATER is a touching take on whether love trumps familial bonds. "A joyful, funny, rich, rewarding and utterly compelling picture." - Stephen Fry.

Loving (2016) (12)

From acclaimed writer/director Jeff Nichols, Loving celebrates the real-life courage and commitment of an interracial couple, Richard and Mildred Loving, who married and then spent the next nine years fighting for the right to live as a family in their hometown. Their civil rights case went all the way to the Supreme Court, which in 1967 reaffirmed the very foundation of the right to marry - and their love story has become an inspiration to couples ever since.